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Dog Crate Training

Dog Crate Training


 
Crate training is a new concept for many, but it is a very effective training tool for adult dogs and puppies. It may take a little time and effort to train your dog to use the crate, but it can prove useful in a variety of situations.
 For instance, if you have a new dog or puppy, a crate is a fantastic way of teaching it the boundaries of the house and keeping it safe.
When you’re travelling in the car, visiting the vet or any other time you may need to confine your dog (eg. after surgery or if it has been injured), it’s much easier and safer if your dog has been trained to enjoy being in a crate.
How big should my crate be and what type should I get?
A crate should be big enough for your dog to stand up, turn around and lie down. Crates can be plastic (used on airlines), wire (collapsible, metal pens) or collapsible fabric crates.
It is not recommended to leave your dog for long periods in a fabric crate unless you are certain that your dog will be happy and calm inside it and will not scratch its way out.
I don’t like the look of a crate! What will my dog think?
A crate is intended to be a ‘safe haven’ or ‘security blanket’ for the dog.
By nature, dogs like small, enclosed spaces, especially when they are feeling a little bit unsure.
By providing your dog with an area where it can ‘escape’ and know it won’t be bothered, it can readily seek out this area when it needs a bit of a break or time-out.
Training your dog to use the crate
The duration of crate training varies from dog to dog.
It will depend on the dog’s age, temperament and past experiences.
It is very important to remember that your crate should be associated only with something pleasant and training should always move at your dog’s pace. Always vary the length of time that your dog will spend in its crate, especially during training.
This will prevent your dog from ‘expecting’ to be let out at a particular time and reduce any issues such as whining or scratching at the crate door.
Introduce your dog to the crate
Introduce it casually
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately.
People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.
To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open.
Then back off and give him a chance to explore it.
Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign.
If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favourite foods and toys near and inside the crate.
The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days.
Be patient with the process.
Make the crate inviting and comfortable for your dog.
When your dog goes near the crate, reward it by throwing a food treat into the crate or near its entrance.
Repeat this every time the dog goes near the crate.
 If the dog settles down inside the crate, reward this behaviour either with your voice or with food rewards.
You want the dog to view the crate as a wonderful place to be, full of goodies and fun.
You don’t want to shut the door of the crate just yet.
Your dog needs to understand that it can come and go as it pleases, therefore reinforcing it as a good place to be.
Feed your dog in the crate
Begin giving your dog its regular meals in the crate.
Place the bowl inside the crate and encourage the dog to enter.
If your dog readily enters the crate at dinner time, start asking it to go in and then place the food inside the crate.
As the dog becomes more comfortable eating in the crate, you can introduce closing the door.
Start by closing the door as your dog eats its meal.
Make sure you open it before the dog finishes its meal.
As you progress, gradually leave the door closed for a few minutes at a time. Soon you should have a dog that will happily stay in its crate after a meal.
If the dog whines; ignore the behaviour and try to reward it or let it out as soon as it is quiet.
Next time, make sure the dog is in the crate for a slightly longer period of time.
Increase the length of time spent in the crate
Once your dog is happy in the crate for about 10 – 15 minutes after finishing its meal, you can start to confine it to the crate for longer periods. Get the dog into the crate using a command such as “crate” or “bed”.
As the dog enters the crate, give it a treat, praise it and close the door.
Quietly sit nearby for a few minutes and reward the dog for remaining calm and happy.
You might even want to open the door and give the dog a rewarding treat-dispensing toy such as a Kong.
Continue with your daily activities and return regularly to reward the dog, either verbally or with a food treat, for its calm behaviour inside the crate.
Start with short sessions and gradually increase the length of time that you leave the dog inside the crate.
This may take several days or weeks.
Crating your dog at night
Once your dog is happy spending time in its crate with you around, you can introduce it to crating at night.
Make sure your dog has toys or treat-dispensing toys with it to initially settle it into the routine.
Keep the crate in a familiar, central area so the dog feels comfortable and settled.
With young puppies or older dogs you may need to take them out for toilet breaks during the night.
By making the crate a ‘fun’ and enjoyable place to be, night time crating should be an easy transition.
Potential problems
Too much time in the crate
Be careful that your puppy doesn’t spend too much time in its crate.
While it is a fantastic tool for toilet training puppies and preventing destruction, a dog of any age should not spend all day in a crate while you are at work and again when you go to bed.
This can affect your dog’s muscle development and condition.
Young puppies shouldn’t spend more than 2-3 hours in the crate without a toilet break as they cannot last that long without relieving themselves.
Whining
If your dog begins whining in its crate, the best thing to do is ignore it.
For a young puppy, whining may occur because it needs to relieve itself, so quietly take it out to the toilet on a lead, making sure not to play with it.
Place it back into its crate once it has gone to the toilet.
Remember that any sort of interaction, positive or negative, will be a ‘reward’ to the dog, so ignoring the whining is best.
However, make sure that you reward the dog appropriately when it has settled and is quiet.
Using a towel or sheet to cover the crate if the whining persists can also help settle the dog.
By following these steps, you can train your dog to not only love its crate, but also see it as a safe haven.
Your dog’s crate can be a place to escape for a much-needed rest, a break from kids or other dogs, and even a portable home that will always be familiar no matter where you are.
 
The real reason for crate training!
Besides preventing problems, is to help you predict when the pup will need to eliminate, so you can take him to the correct spot. The first step is to start a regular feeding schedule. Confine him after eating for 10 to 15 minutes, and then take him to the elimination spot. I say, "Go pee." They do understand, and will learn to pee on command. PRAISE him after he eliminates.
Then take him back in and play with him, or if he likes it outside, play with him outside, or take him for a walk (after third set of shots). If he REALLY likes it outside, and you continually take him inside after eliminating, he will learn to HOLD it to extend his outside time. If you plan to take him for a walk, then he should do his eliminating at home, before you go. Many people take their pups for a walk, and as soon as they eliminate, they bring the dog home, thus sending the message that they are going home because the dog eliminated. If you want to start your walk right away, do not turn around and head home as soon as he poops.
After a half hour of play, crate him for a nap. Every hour (or so as he ages) take him out to pee. If he pees, give him play time, if not, back into crate. Just remember prevention of mistakes, and rewarding for good behavior.
6 weeks—elimination every hour
2 months—pup should have 2 to 3 hours of control
3 months—4 hours
4 months and up—5 hours
Many young dogs can go all night at 3 months.
Always take the puppy out the same door, the one you are going to want him to signal at. Bells work great for some owners. Hang bells on the door, and give them a kick every time you open the door. Some dogs can be quiet, and stand at the door and look at it, some will let out a little yip, but others rely on you to see them standing at the door. So bells can be a marvelous tool. They will learn to swat them to get the door to open. Others use doggy doors. But a young pup can never be sent out to pee, he must be taken out.
 
 
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